Liqueurs

Tasting: 4 French Mathilde Fruit Liqueurs – Paste – Paste Magazine

Summary

Liqueurs are the Swiss army knife of home cocktailing, but they may also be the most intimidating and least understood family of ingredients you’re likely to need in order to make certain drinks. Whereas one can more or less taste a few gins, whiskeys or rums and have a decent idea of what the category is all about, just saying “liqueur” gives you very little information—it only implies a lower-strength (ABV-wise) product that has typically been sweetened with sugar and flavored …….

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Liqueurs are the Swiss army knife of home cocktailing, but they may also be the most intimidating and least understood family of ingredients you’re likely to need in order to make certain drinks. Whereas one can more or less taste a few gins, whiskeys or rums and have a decent idea of what the category is all about, just saying “liqueur” gives you very little information—it only implies a lower-strength (ABV-wise) product that has typically been sweetened with sugar and flavored with an array of potential flavors, including fruits, herbs and spices. As for how one consumes liqueurs, there are as many potential modes as there are consumers—they can make up a very small amount of a cocktail, or they can simply be consumed over ice, or mixed with club soda. Hell, they can even be used in baking.

One common family of liqueurs, however, are fruited liqueurs that are meant to capture the specific flavor of one fruit variety at a time. On the U.S. market, many of these bottles are sadly filled with artificial flavors and sweeteners, making fruited liqueur something of a dicey proposition and a category that doesn’t receive much esteem. They remain vital, however, in the construction of certain cocktails, especially in the tradition of exotic drinks/tiki cocktails where fruit syrups have always been a vital addition. Quite a few tiki drinks, for instance, call for apricot or peach liqueur, and you can also find recipes calling for raspberry or pear fruit flavors as well.

Curious about expanding my own cocktail liqueur library, I jumped at a chance to taste an array of fruited liqueurs that were new to me: the Mathilde Liqueur line from Maison Ferrand. Ferrand is of course a major French alcohol conglomerate, the owner of entities such as the wide-ranging Plantation rum line, as well as Citadelle gin and Ferrand cognac and dried curacao. But they also produce natural fruited liqueurs without “stabilizers or preservatives,” using traditional techniques of alcohol infusion, fermentation and distillation.

I was able to taste the four core entries in this line, infused with raspberry, pear, peach and blackcurrant fruits. Here are some thoughts on each.


ABV: 18%

I was particularly curious to try to peach liqueur, because this is a style of liqueur you actually see call for fairly often in the world of tiki cocktails. It’s essential in classics of the genre such as the Missionary’s Downfall or the Aku Aku, where it is paired with complementary flavors such as pineapple, mint and white rum.

On its own, however, Mathilde’s peach liqueur has a very pelasant, genuinely fuzzy peach aromatic, with touches of white grape on the nose and some more vinous traces. It’s also a little floral, with hints of rose petals. On …….

Source: https://www.pastemagazine.com/drink/liqueurs/mathilde-fruit-liqueurs-review-raspberry-peach-pear-cassis-orange/